Nix Draws Stuff

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NixIllustration.com, my portfolio website, is now online.

See older works I’ve never posted on this blog before! Consider helping me not starve by buying printed stuff and 3D models! Find out just enough personal information to stalk me!*

*Please no.

I am also now open for commissions. Need some eye-catching illustrations, or just want to make me draw something especially for you? Toss an email to mail[at]nixillustration.com with the details of what you’re looking for, and we’ll discuss pricing etc. I can’t simply list price estimates here, unfortunately, since costs will vary a lot depending on size, complexity, style/medium, and time required.

Filed under art paleoart digital art traditional art scratchboard stippling science illustration art commissions science imagery redbubble shapeways nixillustration shameless plug nix sells out

22 notes

Marine Reptile Month #27 — Platypterygius
Early to Late Cretaceous period (~145-93 mya)
Since we started the month with one of the earliest ichthyopterygians, let’s finish off with one of the last. Platypterygius was the only ichthyosaur genus known to have made it through a mid-Cretaceous extinction event, surviving for a few more million years as the last example of its kind before also disappearing. Growing to around 7m long (23ft), it had up to ten fingers in its “hands” giving it particularly broad front flippers.

One specimen shows healed-over bite marks in the lower jaw that appear to have been made by the teeth of another ichthyosaur. So, a little like some modern cetaceans, this particular Platypterygius has quite a few scratches and scars visible over its body.
Color palette used: “Iwatobi”

Marine Reptile Month #27 — Platypterygius

Early to Late Cretaceous period (~145-93 mya)

Since we started the month with one of the earliest ichthyopterygians, let’s finish off with one of the last. Platypterygius was the only ichthyosaur genus known to have made it through a mid-Cretaceous extinction event, surviving for a few more million years as the last example of its kind before also disappearing. Growing to around 7m long (23ft), it had up to ten fingers in its “hands” giving it particularly broad front flippers.

One specimen shows healed-over bite marks in the lower jaw that appear to have been made by the teeth of another ichthyosaur. So, a little like some modern cetaceans, this particular Platypterygius has quite a few scratches and scars visible over its body.

Color palette used: “Iwatobi

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 platypterygius opthalmosauridae ichthyosaur ichthyopterygia Marine Reptiles 3D render nix's adventures in the zbrush learning curve zbrush

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Marine Reptile Month #26 — Atopodentatus
Middle Triassic period (247-242 mya)
Named in early 2014, Atopodentatus is probably the strangest Triassic marine reptile so far. At 3m long (9ft 10in) with a long body, short neck, and stout limbs, it seems to have had a semi-aquatic lifestyle spending time both on land and in the water.
But that’s not the weird part.
It had an absolutely bizarre skull, with a downturned hook on each side of its snout and a vertical split running up the front full of many small zipper-like interlocking teeth. It’s been compared to cartoon monsters and Lovecraftian eldritch horrors. Just what it did with such a highly specialized mouth is unknown — although it may have used it for filter-feeding, sieving tiny prey from mud and silt like modern flamingos or gray whales.
Color palette used: “Star Cycle”

Marine Reptile Month #26 — Atopodentatus

Middle Triassic period (247-242 mya)

Named in early 2014, Atopodentatus is probably the strangest Triassic marine reptile so far. At 3m long (9ft 10in) with a long body, short neck, and stout limbs, it seems to have had a semi-aquatic lifestyle spending time both on land and in the water.

But that’s not the weird part.

It had an absolutely bizarre skull, with a downturned hook on each side of its snout and a vertical split running up the front full of many small zipper-like interlocking teeth. It’s been compared to cartoon monsters and Lovecraftian eldritch horrors. Just what it did with such a highly specialized mouth is unknown — although it may have used it for filter-feeding, sieving tiny prey from mud and silt like modern flamingos or gray whales.

Color palette used: “Star Cycle

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 atopodentatus sauropterygia ...maybe Marine Reptiles its face has been called 'nightmarish' a lot but Nix personally thinks Atopodentatus is adorable cthulhu fhtagn

27 notes

Marine Reptile Month #25 — Vancleavea
Late Triassic period (228-203 mya)
Vancleavea was an unusual late-surviving “non-archosaurian archosauriform”, which basically means it was about as closely related to the archosauria as it’s possible to get without actually being one. 1.2m long (3ft 11in) and covered in overlapping armored scales, its short limbs, deep tail, and upwards-facing nostrils suggest it was a semi-aquatic swimming animal.
Uniquely among all known tetrapods, it also formed its vertical upper tail fin from a row of highly elongated ostederms.
Color palette used: “Shirley the Medium”

Marine Reptile Month #25 — Vancleavea

Late Triassic period (228-203 mya)

Vancleavea was an unusual late-surviving “non-archosaurian archosauriform”, which basically means it was about as closely related to the archosauria as it’s possible to get without actually being one. 1.2m long (3ft 11in) and covered in overlapping armored scales, its short limbs, deep tail, and upwards-facing nostrils suggest it was a semi-aquatic swimming animal.

Uniquely among all known tetrapods, it also formed its vertical upper tail fin from a row of highly elongated ostederms.

Color palette used: “Shirley the Medium

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 vancleavea archosauriformes Marine Reptiles triassic

36 notes

Marine Reptile Month #24 — Askeptosaurus
Middle Triassic period (247-242 mya)
The askeptosaurids had longer necks and narrower snouts than other thalattosaurs, and appear to have been adapted to hunt fish in deeper water.
Askeptosaurus was very thin and elongated, with a flexible eel-like tail making up around half of its 2m length (6ft 6in). Its relatively large eyes, supported by a bony sclerotic ring much like those of ichthyosaurs, would have allowed it good vision in low light levels.
Color palette used: “Aftermath”

Marine Reptile Month #24 — Askeptosaurus

Middle Triassic period (247-242 mya)

The askeptosaurids had longer necks and narrower snouts than other thalattosaurs, and appear to have been adapted to hunt fish in deeper water.

Askeptosaurus was very thin and elongated, with a flexible eel-like tail making up around half of its 2m length (6ft 6in). Its relatively large eyes, supported by a bony sclerotic ring much like those of ichthyosaurs, would have allowed it good vision in low light levels.

Color palette used: “Aftermath

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 askeptosaurus askeptosauroidea thalattosauria Marine Reptiles triassic

21 notes

Marine Reptile Month #23 — Hupehsuchus
Early Triassic period (~251-247 Ma)
The hupehsuchians were icthyosaur-like marine reptiles which may or may not be a sister group to early icthyopterygians like Utatsusaurus. They had long narrow snouts, flipper-like limbs (some displaying polydactyly), and bony armor along their spines. One genus named earlier this year, Parahupehsuchus, even modified its entire ribcage into a rigid bone “body tube”.
Hupehsuchus itself was about 1m long (3ft 3in), and its toothless beak-like snout may have been an adaptation for ram feeding.
Color palette used: “[1LP] Tylee”

Marine Reptile Month #23 — Hupehsuchus

Early Triassic period (~251-247 Ma)

The hupehsuchians were icthyosaur-like marine reptiles which may or may not be a sister group to early icthyopterygians like Utatsusaurus. They had long narrow snouts, flipper-like limbs (some displaying polydactyly), and bony armor along their spines. One genus named earlier this year, Parahupehsuchus, even modified its entire ribcage into a rigid bone “body tube”.

Hupehsuchus itself was about 1m long (3ft 3in), and its toothless beak-like snout may have been an adaptation for ram feeding.

Color palette used: “[1LP] Tylee

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 hupehsuchus hupehsuchia Marine Reptiles triassic

36 notes

Marine Reptile Month #22 — Pachypleurosaurus
Middle Triassic period (~242-235 mya)
Despite having an incredibly similar name, Pachypleurosaurus doesn’t have anything to do with yesterday’s Pleurosaurus. This 1m long (3ft 3in) marine reptile was a basal sauropterygian, closely related to both nothosaurs and plesiosaurs. Unlike the highly adapted flippers of the later plesiosaurs, the limbs of pachypleurosaurs were still very similar to those of terrestrial reptiles, and they probably swam with undulating motions rather than paddling.
Color palette used: “Laced Pastries”

Marine Reptile Month #22 — Pachypleurosaurus

Middle Triassic period (~242-235 mya)

Despite having an incredibly similar name, Pachypleurosaurus doesn’t have anything to do with yesterday’s Pleurosaurus. This 1m long (3ft 3in) marine reptile was a basal sauropterygian, closely related to both nothosaurs and plesiosaurs. Unlike the highly adapted flippers of the later plesiosaurs, the limbs of pachypleurosaurs were still very similar to those of terrestrial reptiles, and they probably swam with undulating motions rather than paddling.

Color palette used: “Laced Pastries

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 pachypleurosaurus pachypleurosauria sauropterygia Marine Reptiles kind of looks like neapolitan ice cream triassic

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Marine Reptile Month #21 — Pleurosaurus
Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous period (~152-140 mya)
The pleurosaurs were aquatic members of the rhynchocephalians, a once-widespread group of lizard-like reptiles represented today by just a single genus, the tuatara.
About 60cm long (2ft), Pleurosaurus had a highly elongated body with short limbs and a powerful tail, and was probably capable of fast swimming with an undulating eel-like motion.
Color palette used: “50 Shades of Baby Food”

Marine Reptile Month #21 — Pleurosaurus

Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous period (~152-140 mya)

The pleurosaurs were aquatic members of the rhynchocephalians, a once-widespread group of lizard-like reptiles represented today by just a single genus, the tuatara.

About 60cm long (2ft), Pleurosaurus had a highly elongated body with short limbs and a powerful tail, and was probably capable of fast swimming with an undulating eel-like motion.

Color palette used: “50 Shades of Baby Food

Filed under art paleoart paleontology colourpod marine reptile month 2014 pleurosaurus pleurosaur rhynchocephalia Marine Reptiles some of these 'ugly' color schemes actually work pretty well

151,335 notes

ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?
YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET
If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.
this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?

YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET

If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.

this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

(via kuraness)

Filed under reblog space mars nasa dingo gap Mars Curiosity curiosity rover solar system planetary landing astronomy astrophysics SCIENCE