awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet), which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light that consequently has a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 

photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensenlouise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)

Species shown here, in order, since a few of the image captions are vague or inaccurate:

Anzu wyliei, the recently-named “chicken from hell”.

Anzu wyliei, the recently-named “chicken from hell”.

iwouldliketoeatrandy:

jtotheizzoe:

alphynix:

[…]

#1: Helicoprion

A cartilaginous fish from off the southwest coast of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana (and later Pangaea), Helicoprion first appeared in the late Carboniferous (310 million years ago) and survived up until just past the massive Permian-Triassic extinction (250mya). […]

I think evolution must work like Ikea, because occasionally nature completely misread the directions and puts a piece on backwards.

Just want to say really quick, I’m pretty sure Gondwana/Gondwanaland came after Pangea. Gondwana was the southern break-up of Pangea which continued into the modern day drifting of continents on tectonic plates. The northern part was Laurasia. 

Gondwana actually existed long before Pangaea, forming at roughly the same time as the Cambrian explosion, 550-500 million years ago — and was probably created during the breakup of a proposed older supercontinent known as Pannotia.

It became part of the forming Pangaea in the late Carboniferous period, about 300 mya, then started breaking off again during the mid Jurassic, around 175 mya. Post-Pangaea Gondwana wasn’t exactly the same as it had been before, leaving a few chunks of itself attached to Laurasia, but it was similar enough that the same name is used for both its earlier and later forms.

aquaam:

Salp/Tunicates
These are exclusively marine. Some have a sponge-like form, living their entire adult lives glued to the spot, while others, like this one (Pegea confoederata), form floating colonies.
Salps have a complex life cycle, with an obligatory alternation of generations. Both portions of the life cycle exist together in the seas—they look quite different, but both are mostly transparent, tubular, gelatinous animals that are typically between 1 and 10 cm (0.39 and 3.94 in) tall. 
Photograph by Kevin Lee/Animal Earth/Thames & Hudso

aquaam:

Salp/Tunicates

These are exclusively marine. Some have a sponge-like form, living their entire adult lives glued to the spot, while others, like this one (Pegea confoederata), form floating colonies.

Salps have a complex life cycle, with an obligatory alternation of generations. Both portions of the life cycle exist together in the seas—they look quite different, but both are mostly transparent, tubular, gelatinous animals that are typically between 1 and 10 cm (0.39 and 3.94 in) tall. 

Photograph by Kevin Lee/Animal Earth/Thames & Hudso

astronomy-to-zoology:

Egyptian Giant Solpugid (Galeodes arabs)

Also known as the Egyptian giant camel spider, the Egyptian giant solpugid is a ‘large’ (6 in) species of solifugid (camel spider) that is native to northern Africa and parts of the Middle East. Like other solifugids G.arabs is a predator and will feed on insects and small vertebrates, dispatching them with its large chelicerae. Contrary to popular belief solifugids are not exceptionally dangerous and are the source of many false myths. G.arabs is well adapted to desert life and can withstand very harsh environments. To deal with the harsh desert sun G.arabs is nocturnal and will ‘rest’ in shrubs, buildings, other shaded places during the day.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Chelicerata-Arachnida-Solifugae-Galeodidae-Galoedes-G.arabs

Images: Micheal & Patricia Fodgen/Corbis and Paul Embden

jtotheizzoe:

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story
"It begins with this obvious observation: Whales poop. In fact, they poop mightily."
Over at NPR, Robert Krulwich has an amazing story about people who study whale poop, and what it teaches us about food webs, trophic levels, fecal recycling, and whales pooping themselves into existence.
Bonus: Want another ecological whale tale? Check out the amazing animated tale of what happens to a whale after it dies. Whale Fall: An ecosystem born in death.
(via Krulwich Wonders…)

jtotheizzoe:

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story

"It begins with this obvious observation: Whales poop. In fact, they poop mightily."

Over at NPR, Robert Krulwich has an amazing story about people who study whale poop, and what it teaches us about food webs, trophic levels, fecal recycling, and whales pooping themselves into existence.

Bonus: Want another ecological whale tale? Check out the amazing animated tale of what happens to a whale after it dies. Whale Fall: An ecosystem born in death.

(via Krulwich Wonders…)

awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits.

talesofdrunkennessandcruelty:


Ant mega-colony takes over world

I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords.

talesofdrunkennessandcruelty:

I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords.