Nix Draws Stuff

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'Giant swimming dinosaur' unearthed

Lead author Nizar Ibrahim, a palaeontologist from the University of Chicago, said: “It is a really bizarre dinosaur - there’s no real blueprint for it.

"It has a long neck, a long trunk, a long tail, a 7ft (2m) sail on its back and a snout like a crocodile.

"And when we look at the body proportions, the animal was clearly not as agile on land as other dinosaurs were, so I think it spent a substantial amount of time in the water."

Life-size reconstruction of Spinosaurus

New Spinosaurus material is officially published — and it’s freaking weird you guys. First confirmed semi-aquatic swimming non-avian dinosaur, and possibly a quadrupedal theropod when moving on land(!!!).

This is turning into the Year of Weird Sail-Backed Dinosaurs, isn’t it?

(Source: arruniel)

Filed under reblog spinosaurus spinosaur theropod dinosaur semi-aquatic non-avian dinosaur quadrupedal theropod? holy shit what mind blown look at those tiny little legs it's ADORABLE bonus post! cue BAWWing from JP Spinosaur fans in 3...2...

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earthstory:

Conjugate normal faultsThis photo comes from a highway in Iran northwest of the city of Tehran and shows normal faults forming a textbook-quality pattern.At the center of the image you see a wedge-shaped area of rock that has moved downward relative to the rocks to the left and right. The faults make a wedge that is about 60 degrees, and the faults are about 60 degrees from the horizontal.This is a great example of how rock mechanics are taught even in textbooks. When rocks are put under stress, either pushed on or pulled on, they often fracture at an angle of about 60 degrees away from the stress due to the internal properties of the rocks. They can also break into 2 conjugate fractures, each at about 60 degrees apart.The faults at the center of this image are a pretty example of how rocks respond to being pulled on. While I’m at it, there’s another fault in this image off to the left just to note for completion. Also interesting to note that the faults seem to peter out in a layer at the bottom of this sequence, a little bit harder to interpret that without seeing a bit more of the 3-D shape of this outcrop.-JBBImage credit: EGU Open Accesshttp://imaggeo.egu.eu/view/807/

earthstory:

Conjugate normal faults

This photo comes from a highway in Iran northwest of the city of Tehran and shows normal faults forming a textbook-quality pattern.
At the center of the image you see a wedge-shaped area of rock that has moved downward relative to the rocks to the left and right. The faults make a wedge that is about 60 degrees, and the faults are about 60 degrees from the horizontal.

This is a great example of how rock mechanics are taught even in textbooks. When rocks are put under stress, either pushed on or pulled on, they often fracture at an angle of about 60 degrees away from the stress due to the internal properties of the rocks. They can also break into 2 conjugate fractures, each at about 60 degrees apart.

The faults at the center of this image are a pretty example of how rocks respond to being pulled on. While I’m at it, there’s another fault in this image off to the left just to note for completion. Also interesting to note that the faults seem to peter out in a layer at the bottom of this sequence, a little bit harder to interpret that without seeing a bit more of the 3-D shape of this outcrop.

-JBB

Image credit: EGU Open Access
http://imaggeo.egu.eu/view/807/

Filed under reblog geology fault extensional fault graben iran tehran stratigraphy geodynamics tectonics structural geology that is some gorgeous bedding right there

30,259 notes

eamo2747 asked: I'm confused about what Beethoven was doing in the black composers post. He was German.

krismichelle429:

deadcatwithaflamethrower:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

By golly gee! I keep forgetting that Black people didn’t exist until the Fresh Prince of Bel Air came on television! Or that Black people existed in anywhere else than Africa even with slavery going on :) My apologies.

Anyway, here’s proof that Beethoven was Black:

"… Said directly, Beethoven was a black man. Specifically, his mother was a Moor, that group of Muslim Northern Africans who conquered parts of Europe—making Spain their capital—for some 800 years.

In order to make such a substantial statement, presentation of verifiable evidence is compulsory. Let’s start with what some of Beethoven’s contemporaries and biographers say about his brown complexion:

Beethoven2

(Louis Letronne, Beethoven, 1814, pencil drawing.)

"Frederick Hertz, German anthropologist, used these terms to describe him: ‘Negroid traits, dark skin, flat, thick nose.’

Emil Ludwig, in his book ‘Beethoven,’ says: ‘His face reveals no trace of the German. He was so dark that people dubbed him Spagnol [dark-skinned].’

Fanny Giannatasio del Rio, in her book ‘An Unrequited Love: An Episode in the Life of Beethoven,’ wrote ‘His somewhat flat broad nose and rather wide mouth, his small piercing eyes and swarthy [dark] complexion, pockmarked into the bargain, gave him a strong resemblance to a mulatto.’

deathmaskdeathmask2
Beethoven’s death mask: profile and full face

C. Czerny stated, ‘His beard—he had not shaved for several days—made the lower part of his already brown face still darker.’

Following are one word descriptions of Beethoven from various writers: Grillparzer, ‘dark’; Bettina von Armin, ‘brown’; Schindler, ‘red and brown’; Rellstab, ‘brownish’; Gelinek, ‘short, dark.’

In Alexander Thayer’s Life of Beethoven, vol.1, p. 134,  the author states, “there is none of that obscurity which exalts one to write history as he would have it and not as it really was. The facts are too patent.” On this same page, he states that the German composer Franz Josef Haydn was referred to as a “Moor” by Prince Esterhazy, and Beethoven had “even more of the Moor in his looks.’ On p. 72, a Beethoven contemporary, Gottfried Fischer, describes him as round-nosed and of dark complexion. Also, he was called ‘der Spagnol’ (the Spaniard).

Other “patent” sources, of which there are many, include, but are not limited to, Beethoven by Maynard Solomon, p.78. He is described as having “thick, bristly coal-black hair” (in today’s parlance, we proudly call it ‘kinky’) and a ‘ruddy-complexioned face.’ In   Beethoven:  His Life and Times by Artes Orga, p.72, Beethoven’s pupil, Carl Czerny of the ‘School of Velocity’ fame, recalls that Beethoven’s ‘coal-black hair, cut a la Titus, stood up around his head [sounds almost like an Afro].  His black beard…darkened the lower part of his dark-complexioned face.’

  BeethovenCweb

Engraving by Blasius Hofel, Beethoven, 1814, color facsimile of engraving after a pencil drawing by Louis Letronne. This engraving was regarded in Beethoven’s circle as particularly lifelike. Beethoven himself thought highly of it, and gave several copies to his friends.

Beethoven, the Black Spaniard

(read more here)

They whitewashed BEETHOVEN?  O_O

Thank you, history/fact-checking Tumblr.

I now feel the need to go burn every white-skinned image of Beethoven I can find.

Can someone find me an emoticon or gif of someone who’s mind is so thoroughly blown she can’t make mouth-words? Because that is how I feel right now. Literally every other adult in my entire family has a music degree and plays an instrument. I’ve gone my entire life surrounded by dedicated, educated musicians. I majored in music in college for a year. And not ONCE, has any of this ever been mentioned. Not once has even the POSSIBILITY that Beethoven might not have been white ever been considered. Literally every image I have ever seen of Beethoven has been white. Like, omg. I just can’t.

Filed under reblog history beethoven poc music composers important history lesson! holy shit what mind blown whitewashing racism

117 notes

Oncorhynchus rastrosus, the “sabertooth salmon”. Reaching up to 2.7m long (9ft), this enormous fanged fish lived along the Pacific coast of North America from 13 mya to sometime in the last couple million years — barely missing encountering modern humans, in geological time.

Aside from the hooked “saberteeth” at the tip of its snout, O. rastrosus had few teeth and very large gill rakers — suggesting it primarily fed on plankton, similarly to its modern relative the sockeye salmon.

[Available on Redbubble!]

Oncorhynchus rastrosus, the “sabertooth salmon”. Reaching up to 2.7m long (9ft), this enormous fanged fish lived along the Pacific coast of North America from 13 mya to sometime in the last couple million years — barely missing encountering modern humans, in geological time.

Aside from the hooked “saberteeth” at the tip of its snout, O. rastrosus had few teeth and very large gill rakers — suggesting it primarily fed on plankton, similarly to its modern relative the sockeye salmon.

[Available on Redbubble!]

Filed under art paleoart paleontology Oncorhynchus rastrosus salmon sabertooth sabertooth salmon Smilodonichthys salmonidae salmoniformes actinopterygii fish I did not know this was A Thing until like last week nix sells out

2 notes

kororaa asked: how can they tell that cardinal is a gynandromorph and not just pied?

It could be a pied half-sider, since that particular bird looks rather pale on the ‘female’ half. (I’m not very familiar with cardinals, being British, but apparently the females are usually more obviously brown?) Without catching it and getting some DNA samples it’s impossible to tell for certain. Gyndandromorphism is well-recorded in domestic bird species, though, so it probably happens in the wild much more often than we realize. We only notice the ones with an obvious difference between the two sides.